Drupal Planet

Bay Area Drupal Camp: 10 Things to Make Your BADCamp ROCK!

5 dni 18 godzin ago
10 Things to Make Your BADCamp ROCK! Drupal Planet rob.thorne Fri, 10/12/2018 - 04:27

Here’s a list of the 10 important tips and tricks to help make your sure you have a magical BADCamp experience.

BADCamp is sure to be a great event. Tickets are FREE.

Register today!

1. Wear Good, Comfortable Shoes

If you want to have a great time the whole time you’re at BADCamp, we STRONGLY recommend wearing shoes that are comfortable, but give you lots of support. You don’t want to miss out on all the fun stuff we have planned because you have to take a break to rest your poor tootsies. Don’t wear brand new shoes either and you might want to also get insoles.

2. Dress in Layers

October in Berkeley is beautiful, but let’s face it, room temperatures are unpredictable. For this reason, bring a hoodie (or donate to get a special edition 2018 BADCamp hoodie) that you can throw on and/or take off as the climate requires.

3. Plan Your Schedule

Are you coming to learn specific skills? Check out the training classes, summits and sessions available and create your own schedule.

Do you want to find a new employer? Check out the job board and sponsors expo to meet awesome Drupal shops

Who do you want to meet with while you are at BADCamp? A famous podcaster or module maintainer? Find out who is coming on the attendee list and reach out to connect. Magical moments are frequent at BADCamp!

4. Bring a Laptop

If you want to get the most out of your BADCamp experience, be sure to bring a laptop. You will want to follow along and try some of the cool things the presenters show you. Bring a notepad too. Sometimes getting to an outlet to charge your laptop can be tricky. So that you don’t forget something important while your laptop charges, bring a notebook or notepad and a pen and take some notes.

5. Bring a Water Bottle/Travel Mug

There will be water fountains and FREE coffee/tea. Bringing a refillable water bottle means that you can stay focused on what you’re doing longer and get the most out of the sessions you're attending. Not to mention, using a water bottle instead of buying bottles of water is far better for the environment.

6. Bring Chargers for ALL your Devices and a Mobile Charger

There’s nothing worse than being out and about with a dead phone/tablet/laptop. Bring chargers for all of the devices you intend to use at BADCamp. If you use a battery-operated mouse (or wireless remote for presenting), bringing an extra set of batteries couldn’t hurt either. Even if you don’t end up needing them, you could find yourself with a new friend when you share those extra batteries with someone in need.

7. Bring Business Cards

Make it easy to connect! You will meet lots of great people and some of them you will want to keep in touch with. Get in the habit of giving out a card when you meet someone.

8. Condense your Stuff

You will walk around campus, so a lighter load is ideal. Plus you will want room for SWAG!  Condense your backpack down. Pro Tip: Get a small tote or even a Ziploc bag to stick all of your conference swag in. That way all of the stickers and little bits and pieces are in one bag that you can stick in your luggage at the end of the conference.

9. Bring a Pair of Headphones

As much as we all want to be able to unplug from our jobs and just focus on the sessions, it’s not always possible. Sometimes you have to put your nose to the grindstone and get some work done. If you’re the type that needs to listen to some music while you work, bring along a pair of earbuds so that you can focus and not disturb others around you.

10. Bring a Friend

While not required, having a friend tag along with you can make for a memorable BADCamp experience. If you’re like me and you’re road tripping to BADCamp, think of all of the awesome photos, sing-a-longs, and weird roadside attractions that you’ll see and get to enjoy together. If you’re flying, it’s always nice to have a travel buddy to keep you company while you’re waiting at the airport during the inevitable layover.

Pro Tip: Don’t use your buddy as a reason to shut out others. Go in with an open mind and you’re sure to find another new friend (or friends!) to share the experience with.

🎠 🎠 🎠 🎠 🎠 🎠 We need your help!

BADCamp is 100% volunteer driven and we need your hands! We need stout hearts to volunteer and help set up, tear down, give directions and so much more!  If you are local and can help us, please sign up on our Volunteer Form.

Looking for Work?

BADCamp is a great opportunity to network, learn what technologies are in demand,
and what companies are doing great stuff in Drupal Space.

If you’re looking for work, you can also make sure you’ve checked the “I am interested in Drupal Jobs” box either when you registered, or by going to your user account and clicking on the “Edit” link (the box is a towards the bottom of the form, so keep scrolling). If you do this, our sponsors will know you’re interested in looking for a job, and you will get a digest of jobs post BADCamp.

Be sure to check out the Job Board to see if there are jobs you’d be interested in applying for amd stop by the sponsor expo to meet your future team!

Looking for People?

Looking to hire Drupal talent?  A lot of Drupal talent will be at BADCamp.  If you’re sponsoring BADCamp, you have a head start here.  Sponsors at the Supporting Level  (the $350 level) get to post one job and get all the goodness of being promoted as part of the sponsorship. Just go to the Job Board page and click on “CREATE A JOB POSTING”.  Tell potential hires about the opportunities you have available, and what it's like to work with Drupal.

 

Sponsors

A BIG thanks Platform.sh, Pantheon & DDEV and all our sponsors who have committed early. Without them this magical event wouldn’t be possible. We are also looking for MORE sponsors to help keep BADCamp free and awesome. Interested in sponsoring BADCamp? Contact matt@badcamp.net or anne@badcamp.net.

Would you have been willing to pay for your ticket?  If so, then you can give back to the camp by purchasing an individual sponsorship at the level most comfortable for you. As our thanks, we will be handing out some awesome BADCamp swag as our thanks.

 

    See You At BADCamp!!

Acquia Developer Center Blog: Decoupled Drupal Authentication with OAuth 2.0

6 dni 10 godzin ago

Perhaps the most critical component of any decoupled Drupal architecture is a robust authentication mechanism that protects data transmitted between a Drupal site and API consumers like JavaScript applications and native mobile applications. While Drupal core makes available HTTP Basic Authentication and cookie-based authentication, both easy to use, neither of these approaches is sufficiently secure when it comes to best practices.

Tags: acquia drupal planet

Amazee Labs: Atomic Design in Drupal with GraphQL & Twig - Webinar Recap

6 dni 12 godzin ago
Atomic Design in Drupal with GraphQL & Twig - Webinar Recap

The second Amazee Labs webinar took place last Friday, 28th September 2018. Philipp Melab gave a stunning presentation on “Atomic Design in Drupal with GraphQL & Twig”. Here's a short recap of what we learned together.

Daniel Lemon Thu, 10/11/2018 - 12:46

We kick-started the webinar with a summary of what we learned in the first webinar, in case you missed that you can read up on it here. This time our focus was to build a real-world example website for a fictional web agency called Amazing Apps.

Philipp wanted to pack as much information as possible into the webinar, so he set up a Github repository with everything you need to get started. We were shown a brief design of the end goal then jumped straight into the meat of the presentation by dissecting the git history of each commit in the repository together.

Clean, concise, & a well-structured frontend.

Fractal is a tool to help you build and document web component libraries and then integrate them into your projects. We were led through the basics of what Fractal provides as a starting point. Then we jumped through the repository to a point where we had a couple of components built, along with colours defined using CSS variables along with demo text content.

As part of Atomic Design, we explored and learned the use of atoms, molecules, and organisms. Atoms demonstrate all your base styles at a glance, such as a logo or a button. Molecules are UI elements containing two or more atoms functioning together as a unit, such as a menu. Organisms are relatively complex UI components containing multiple molecules, atoms, or other organisms, such as the header or footer.

fragment Menu on Menu { links { label url { path } } }

Once we got to the menu component, we were treated with the first GraphQL fragment, from here we could navigate up the templates from molecule to the header organism, and then to the page layout template which called the twig block named header. We can then override these blocks with the use of the twig tag extends to inject our Fractal based templates as necessary along with our GraphQL fragment.

GraphQL Twig should be used to decouple things where it makes sense, building a fully decoupled solution still costs a lot regarding development; therefore GraphQL Twig is the right solution to enhance and modernise a site in a feature based manner.

Learnings as a webinar host

It was our second webinar, so we had a few learnings from our first edition which we incorporated into the new session. We made sure to start earlier with the marketing campaign to ensure a good turn out, and ideally a larger audience; we ended up with over 40% increase in the total audience!

Check out the Github repository and accompanying videos:

Amazee Labs would like to thank everyone who attended the live session, we enjoyed being able to share this with you, and we look forward to hosting another Amazee Labs webinar in the future.

You can watch the entire webinar here:

Mass.gov Digital Services: ConCon 2018: Lessons learned from the first ever Massachusetts Content Conference

1 tydzień ago
Authors are eager to learn, and a content-focused community is forming. But there’s still work to do.https://medium.com/media/689d9086ea350238717e9ce04b381d9e/href

When you spend most of your time focused on how to serve constituents on digital channels, it can be good to simply get some face time with peers. It’s an interesting paradox of the work we do alongside our partners at organizations across the state. Getting in a room and discussing content strategy is always productive.

That was one of the main reasons behind organizing the first ever Massachusetts Content Conference (ConCon). More than 100 attendees from 35 organizations came together for a day of learning and networking at District Hall in Boston. There were 15 sessions on everything from how to use Mayflower — the Commonwealth’s design system — to what it takes to create an awesome service.

Graphic showing more than 100 attendees from 50 organizations attended 15 sessions from 14 presenters at ConCon 2018.

ConCon is and will always be about our authors, and we’re encouraged by the feedback we’ve received from them so far. Of the attendees who responded to a survey, 93% said they learned about new tools or techniques to help them create better content. More so, 96% said they would return to the next ConCon. The average grade attendees gave to the first ever ConCon on a scale of 1 to 10 — with 1 being the worst and 10 the best — was 8.3.

Our authors were engaged and ready to share their experiences, which made for an educational environment, for their peers as well as our own team at Digital Services. In fact, it was an eye opening experience, and we took a lot away from the event. Here are some of our team’s reflections on what they learned about our authors and our content needs moving forward.

We’re starting to embrace data and feedback“The way we show feedback and scores per page is great but it doesn’t help authors prioritize their efforts to get the biggest gain for their constituents. We’re working hard to increase visibility of this data in Drupal.”— Joe Galluccio

Katie Rahhal, Content Strategist
“I learned we’re moving in the right direction with our analysis and Mass.gov feedback tools. In the breakout sessions, I heard over and over that our content authors really like the ones we have and they want more. More ways to review their feedback, more tools to improve their content quality, and they’re open to learning new ways to improve their content.”

Christine Bath, Designer
“It was so interesting and helpful to see how our authors use and respond to user feedback on Mass.gov. It gives us a lot of ideas for how we can make it easier to get user feedback to our authors in more actionable ways. We want to make it easy to share constituent feedback within agencies to power changes on Mass.gov.”

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@SeeBath on good #design: It's all about the balance between style and substance. #UX #CivicTech #MAConCon

 — @MassGovDigital

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Joe Galluccio, Product Manager
“I learned how important it is for our authors to get performance data integrated into the Drupal authoring experience. The way we show feedback and scores per page is great but it doesn’t help authors prioritize their efforts to get the biggest gain for their constituents. We’re working hard to increase visibility of this data in Drupal.”

Our keynote speaker gave a great use case for improving user journeys

Bryan Hirsch, Deputy Chief Digital Officer
“Having Dana Chisnell, co-founder of the Center for Civic Design, present her work on mapping and improving the journey of American voters was the perfect lesson at the perfect time. The page-level analytics dashboards are a good foundation we want to build on. In the next year, we’re going to research, test, and build Mass.gov journey analytics dashboards. We’re also spending this year working with partner organizations on mapping end-to-end user journeys for different services. Dana’s experience on how to map a journey, identify challenges, and then improve the process was relevant to everyone in the room. It was eye-opening, enlightening, and exciting. There are a lot of opportunities to improve the lives of our constituents.”

Want to know how we created our page-level data dashboards? Read Custom dashboards: Surfacing data where Mass.gov authors need itbody[data-twttr-rendered="true"] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}

Hello from #MAConCon! Learning about democracy as a design problem with a keynote by @danachis. The voter user journey is fascinating! 🗳

 — @epubpupil

function notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize) {donkey.resize(height); resized = true;}if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var obj = {iframe: window.frameElement, height: height}; parent._resizeIframe(obj); resized = true;}if (window.location && window.location.hash === "#amp=1" && window.parent && window.parent.postMessage) {window.parent.postMessage({sentinel: "amp", type: "embed-size", height: height}, "*");}if (window.webkit && window.webkit.messageHandlers && window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize) {window.webkit.messageHandlers.resize.postMessage(height); resized = true;}return resized;}twttr.events.bind('rendered', function (event) {notifyResize();}); twttr.events.bind('resize', function (event) {notifyResize();});if (parent && parent._resizeIframe) {var maxWidth = parseInt(window.frameElement.getAttribute("width")); if ( 500 < maxWidth) {window.frameElement.setAttribute("width", "500");}}The Mayflower Design System is a work in progress“It’s great to see there’s a Mayflower community forming among stakeholders in different roles across state government. ”— Minghua Sun

Sienna Svob, Developer and Data Analyst
“We need to work harder to build a Mayflower community that will support the diversity of print, web, and applications across the Commonwealth. Agencies are willing and excited to use Mayflower and we need to harness this and involve them more to make it a better product.”

Minghua Sun, Mayflower Product Owner
“I’m super excited to see that so many of the content authors came to the Mayflower breakout session. They were not only interested in using the Mayflower Design System to create a single face of government but also raised constructive questions and were willing to collaborate on making it better! After the conference we followed up with more information and invited them to the Mayflower public Slack channel. It’s great to see there’s a Mayflower community forming among stakeholders in different roles across state government. ”

All digital channels support content strategy

Sam Mathius, Digital Communications Strategist
“It was great to see how many of our authors rely on digital newsletters to connect with constituents, which came up during a breakout session on the topic. Most of them feel like they need some help integrating them into their overall content strategy, and they were particularly excited about using tools and software to help them collect better data. In fact, attendees from some organizations mentioned how they’ve used newsletter data to uncover seasonal trends that help them inform the rest of their content strategy. I think that use case got the analytics gears turning for a lot of folks, which is exciting.”

Authors are eager and excited to learn and share“I’d like to see us create more opportunities for authors to get together in informal sessions. They’re such a diverse group, but they share a desire to get it right.”— Fiona Molloy

Shannon Desmond, Content Strategist
“I learned that the Mass.gov authors are energetic about the new content types that have been implemented over the past 8 months and are even more eager to learn about the new enhancements to the content management system (CMS) that continue to roll out. Furthermore, as a lifelong Massachusetts resident and a dedicated member of the Mass.gov team, it was enlightening to see how passionate the authors are about translating government language and regulations for constituents in a way that can be easily and quickly understood by the constituents of the State.”

Fiona Molloy, Content Strategist
“Talking to people who came to ConCon and sitting in on various sessions, it really struck me how eager our content authors are to learn — whether from us here at Digital Services or from each other. I’d like to see us create more opportunities for authors to get together in informal sessions. They’re such a diverse group, but they share a desire to get it right and that’s really encouraging as we work together to build a better Mass.gov.”

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Digital Services Policy Advisor @g_bagarella kicks off a session with Michael Orcutt, Michelle Leonard, and Michael Wessler on how they use https://t.co/w4L9Th3X4N authoring tools to improve their content. #MAConCon

 — @MassGovDigital

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Adam Cogbill, Content Strategist
“I was reminded that one of the biggest challenges that government content authors face is communicating lots of complex information. We need to make sure we understand our audience’s relationships to our content, both through data about their online behavior and through user testing.”

Greg Derosiers, Content Strategist
“I learned we need to do a better job of offering help and support. There were a number of authors in attendance that didn’t know about readily-available resources that we had assumed people just weren’t interested in. We need to re-evaluate how we’re marketing these services and make sure everyone knows what’s available.”

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We're ready for a full day of learning how to improve https://t.co/w4L9Th3X4N content for our constituents at #MAConCon!

 — @MassGovDigital

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Thinking about hosting your own content conference? Reach out to us! We’d love to share lessons and collaborate with others in the civic tech community.

Interested in a career in civic tech? Find job openings at Digital Services.
Follow us on Twitter | Collaborate with us on GitHub | Visit our site

ConCon 2018: Lessons learned from the first ever Massachusetts Content Conference was originally published in MA Digital Services on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: How a Content Management System Can Help Streamline Your Business

1 tydzień ago

 The reality is that running a business is such a diverse and complex endeavor that managing complex and rapidly evolving software solutions needed to execute the mission can be an overwhelming component. It already takes enough energy and expertise to be proficient in managing people, knowing your vertical, regulating cash flow, envisioning new products, evaluating old products, and on and on and on. The problem, however, is that if you don’t leverage complex and rapidly evolving software solutions to handle processes, you end up drowning in inefficiency and inconsistency. So therein lies a significant and difficult problem because you likely didn’t get into business to become an informal senior software architect. And that’s where leveraging something like a robust CMS comes into play. 

Let’s look at some of the ways leveraging a modern CMS, like Drupal, for example, can significantly streamline your business and free you to, well, run your business.