Drupal Planet

Ashday's Digital Ecosystem and Development Tips: Better Admin Interfaces with ReactJS and Drupal 8

2 dni 6 godzin ago

As you may or may not have noticed, we’re having a lot of fun over here at Ashday building Drupal sites with React. Check out our own site, for example. We are really digging this new direction for front-end and you can learn more about why we did it how we approached it in other articles, but here we are going to talk about how we approached the Drupal editorial experience, because honestly - we just didn’t find a lot of great resources out there discussing how this might be done well in a decoupled experience.

Drupal blog: A plan for Drupal and Composer

2 dni 10 godzin ago

This blog has been re-posted and edited with permission from Dries Buytaert's blog. Please leave your comments on the original post.

At DrupalCon Nashville, we launched a strategic initiative to improve support for Composer in Drupal 8. To learn more, you can watch the recording of my DrupalCon Nashville keynote or read the Composer Initiative issue on Drupal.org.

While Composer isn't required when using Drupal core, many Drupal site builders use it as the preferred way of assembling websites (myself included). A growing number of contributed modules also require the use of Composer, which increases the need to make Composer easier to use with Drupal.

The first step of the Composer Initiative was to develop a plan to simplify Drupal's Composer experience. Since DrupalCon Nashville, Mixologic, Mile23, Bojanz, Webflo, and other Drupal community members have worked on this plan. I was excited to see that last week, they shared their proposal.

The first phase of the proposal is focused on a series of changes in the main Drupal core repository. The directory structure will remain the same, but it will include scripts, plugins, and embedded packages that enable the bundled Drupal product to be built from the core repository using Composer. This provides users who download Drupal from Drupal.org a clear path to manage their Drupal codebase with Composer if they choose.

I'm excited about this first step because it will establish a default, official approach for using Composer with Drupal. That makes using Composer more straightforward, less confusing, and could theoretically lower the bar for evaluators and newcomers who are familiar with other PHP frameworks. Making things easier for site builders is a very important goal; web development has become a difficult task, and removing complexity out of the process is crucial.

It's also worth noting that we are planning the Automatic Updates Initiative. We are exploring if an automated update system can be build on top of the Composer Initiative's work, and provide an abstraction layer for those that don't want to use Composer directly. I believe that could be truly game-changing for Drupal, as it would remove a great deal of complexity.

If you're interested in learning more about the Composer plan, or if you want to provide feedback on the proposal, I recommend you check out the Composer Initiative issue and comment 37 on that issue.

Implementing this plan will be a lot of work. How fast we execute these changes depends on how many people will help. There are a number of different third-party Composer related efforts, and my hope is to see many of them redirect their efforts to make Drupal's out-of-the-box Composer effort better. If you're interested in getting involved or sponsoring this work, let me know and I'd be happy to connect you with the right people!

Dries Buytaert: A plan for Drupal and Composer

2 dni 11 godzin ago

At DrupalCon Nashville, we launched a strategic initiative to improve support for Composer in Drupal 8. To learn more, you can watch the recording of my DrupalCon Nashville keynote or read the Composer Initiative issue on Drupal.org.

While Composer isn't required when using Drupal core, many Drupal site builders use it as the preferred way of assembling websites (myself included). A growing number of contributed modules also require the use of Composer, which increases the need to make Composer easier to use with Drupal.

The first step of the Composer Initiative was to develop a plan to simplify Drupal's Composer experience. Since DrupalCon Nashville, Mixologic, Mile23, Bojanz, Webflo, and other Drupal community members have worked on this plan. I was excited to see that last week, they shared their proposal.

The first phase of the proposal is focused on a series of changes in the main Drupal core repository. The directory structure will remain the same, but it will include scripts, plugins, and embedded packages that enable the bundled Drupal product to be built from the core repository using Composer. This provides users who download Drupal from Drupal.org a clear path to manage their Drupal codebase with Composer if they choose.

I'm excited about this first step because it will establish a default, official approach for using Composer with Drupal. That makes using Composer more straightforward, less confusing, and could theoretically lower the bar for evaluators and newcomers who are familiar with other PHP frameworks. Making things easier for site builders is a very important goal; web development has become a difficult task, and removing complexity out of the process is crucial.

It's also worth noting that we are planning the Automatic Updates Initiative. We are exploring if an automated update system can be build on top of the Composer Initiative's work, and provide an abstraction layer for those that don't want to use Composer directly. I believe that could be truly game-changing for Drupal, as it would remove a great deal of complexity.

If you're interested in learning more about the Composer plan, or if you want to provide feedback on the proposal, I recommend you check out the Composer Initiative issue and comment 37 on that issue.

Implementing this plan will be a lot of work. How fast we execute these changes depends on how many people will help. There are a number of different third-party Composer related efforts, and my hope is to see many of them redirect their efforts to make Drupal's out-of-the-box Composer effort better. If you're interested in getting involved or sponsoring this work, let me know and I'd be happy to connect you with the right people!

Agiledrop.com Blog: AGILEDROP: Introduction to Drupal Commerce

3 dni 2 godziny ago
Drupal and Commerce. These are two words that aren’t usually associated with each other. But do you know that Drupal can become a great eCommerce solution thanks to a dedicated software for it called Drupal Commerce? If you didn’t, then well, you are in for a treat. Let’s take a look at what Drupal Commerce is and how it can be used to create an eCommerce store using Drupal. Drupal Commerce at its core is a set of modules for Drupal that enable a host of eCommerce functionalities for Drupal which I’ll be highlighting further in the post. It was developed and is maintained by The Commerce… READ MORE

Acro Media: Web to Print with Drupal Commerce

3 dni 11 godzin ago
Empower your customers to customize products.


There is a high likelihood that the tshirt on your back or in your closet started life as someone’s idea that was being uploaded to an online tool. The idea that a person could not only buy tshirts, but design them in a tool and approve the proof before payment seems almost commonplace. Why aren’t more people talking about this? Your customers are expecting more tailored experiences when buying decorated apparel, signage and personalized promotional products from the small to medium web store fronts. Getting the “Web to Print” toolset just right on Drupal is not easy.

Here’s just a few of the expectations for ordering printed materials from the web on Drupal:

  • Drupal integration: Full integration with existing Drupal website
  • Intuitive editor experience: Drag and drop toolset, uploading of files (jpg, png, tiff, pdf, eps, ai, psd), cropping and quick fixes to pictures, lots of fonts, pop-over text formatting, white labelled branding with plenty of customizations, low resolution upload warnings, and mobile friendly web to print tool.
  • Proof and checkout workflow: Print-quality PDF proof, edit before purchase, edit after purchase, CMYK color space, super large files that need processing
Getting off the bespoke product editor island

An example of a bespoke web to print tool Acro Media built with Drupal and jQuery UI.

Like many Drupal agencies, there’s rarely a problem we face that can’t be solved with in-house open source tools. Before we decry the problems, we are very proud of what we accomplished in the past given budget and available tools. With jQuery UI and html-to-pdf experience, we’ve built these kinds of tools before, to varying degrees of success. Every time we tackled a project like web-to-print, the struggle became very real. With minimal hours, the tools we knew and loved created a functional experience that was hard to maintain and very error prone.

More often than not, we had trouble with converting HTML to PDF reliably enough for high-resolution print-quality, especially with customer supplied imagery and layout. Offering fonts in a customized product builder is challenging to get right, especially when you’re creating a PDF that has to have the font attached. The RGB colorspace doesn’t translate easily to CMYK, the most common four color process for printing. And all of our experience in software revolved around pixels, not these things called picas. In this crazy world resolution could go as high as 3200 dpi on standard printers, dimensions suddenly couldn’t be determined based on pixels.

When one of our clients that had a tool we had built with existing technologies asked for some (not all) of the features mentioned in the beginning of the article, we also wanted to solve all the technical challenges that we grappled with over a year ago. As the planning stage was coming to an end, it was clear the budget wasn’t going to support such a complicated software build.

Product Customization is not the right phrase

Example screenshot of keditor in action.

We started to look for product customization tools and found nada. Then we looked for web layout tools which would maybe give Drupal a better HTML editing experience, but found a disappointing lack of online web to print solutions. We did find grapejs, innovastudio, and keditor

But, almost universally, these javascript-based libraries were focused on content and not editing products that would be printed. We needed something that had the goal of creating a printable image or PDF with a tight integration around the editor experience. We had nearly convinced ourselves there wasn’t a vertical for this concept, it seemed like nearly all product builders in the wild were powered by one-off conglomerations of toolsets.

Web to Print using Customer’s Canvas works with Drupal, right?

Finally, via a project manager, an industry phrase was discovered that opened the floodgates: web to print. After a bit of sifting through the sales pitch of all the technologies, almost all tools were found to be cumbersome and hard to integrate in an existing Drupal website, save one. Customer’s Canvas checked all the boxes and then some:

  • SAAS (so we don’t have to host customer’s images, or maintain the technology)
  • White label
  • More than fully featured
  • Completely customizable
  • Iframe-friendly. Meaning we could seamlessly plop the product customization tool into an existing or new layout.

Example of Customers Canvas running in Drupal Commerce.

To make an even longer story short, we jumped on board with Customer’s Canvas and built the first (to our knowledge) third party web to print Drupal 7 module. We might make a Tech Talk regarding the installation and feature set of the module. Until then, here’s what you can do:

  1. Download and install the module
  2. Provide some API credentials in the form of a javascript link
  3. Turn on the Drupal Commerce integration
  4. Provide some JSON configuration for a product via a field that gets added to your choice of product types.
  5. Click on Add to Cart for a Customer’s Canvas product
  6. Get redirected to a beautiful tool
  7. Click “Finish” and directed to a cart that can redirect you back to edit or download your product.
  8. As a store administrator, you can also edit the product from the order view page.

Drupal 8 and Web to Print and the Future

Currently, the module is built for Drupal 7. Upgrading to Drupal 8 Commerce 2 is definitely on our roadmap and should be a straightforward upgrade. Other things on the roadmap:

  • Better B2B features
    You can imagine a company needs signs for all of it’s franchisee partners and would want the ability to create stores of customizable signage. With Commerce on Drupal 8, that would be pretty straightforward to build.
  • More download options
    Customer’s Canvas supports lower res watermarked downloads for the customers as well as the high res PDF downloads. Currently the module displays the high resolution for all parties.
  • Better administrative interface
    If you’re using Drupal 7, the integration for this module is pretty easy, but the technical experience required for creating the JSON formatting for each product is pretty cumbersome. So it would be awesome (and very possible) to build out the most common customizations in an administration interface so you wouldn’t have to manage the JSON formatting for most situations.
  • Improve the architecture
    Possibly support Customer’s Canvas templates like entities that are referenced so that you could create a dozen or so customizable experiences and then link them up to thousands of products.
  • Webform support
    The base module assumes your experience at least starts with an entity that has fields and gets rendered. We could build a webform integration that would allow the webform to have a customer’s canvas build step. T-shirt design content anyone?
Integration can be a game changer

One of the big reasons we work with Drupal and Drupal Commerce is that anything with an API can be integrated. This opens the doors to allow the platform to do so much more than any other platform out there. If an integration needs to be made, we can do. If you need an integration made, talk to us! We're happy to help.

Evolving Web: Resizing Fields in Drupal 8 Without Losing Data

3 dni 12 godzin ago

Drupal's field system is awesome and it is one of the reasons why I started using Drupal in the first place. However, there are some small limitations in it which surface from time to time. Say, you have a Text (Plain) field named field_one_liner which is 64 characters long. You created around 30 nodes and then you realized that the field size should have been 255. Now, if you try to do this from Drupal's field management UI, you will get a message saying:

There is data for this field in the database. The field settings can no longer be changed.

So, the only way you can resize it is after deleting the existing field! This doesn't make much sense because it's indeed possible to increase a field's size using SQL without saying goodbye to the data.

In this tutorial, we'll see how to increase the size of an existing Text (Plain) field in Drupal 8 without losing data using a hook_update_N().

Assumptions
  • You have intermediate / advanced knowledge of Drupal.
  • You know how to develop modules for Drupal.
  • You have basic knowledge of SQL.
Prerequisites

If you're going to try out the code provided in this example, make sure you have the following field on any node type:

  • Name: One-liner
  • Machine name: field_one_liner
  • Type: Text (Plain)
  • Length: 64

After you configure the field, create some nodes with some data on the One-liner field.

Note: Reducing the length of a field might result in data loss / truncation.

Implementing hook_update_N()

Reference: Custom Field Resize module on GitHub

hook_update_N() lets you run commands to update the database schema. You can create, update and delete database tables and columns using this hook after your module has been installed. To implement this hook, you need to have a custom module. For this example, I've implemented this hook in a custom module which I've named custom_field_resize. I usually name all my custom modules custom_ to namespace them. In the custom module, we implement the hook in a MODULE.install file, where MODULE is the machine-name of your module.

/** * Increase the length of "field_one_liner" to 255 characters. */ function custom_field_resize_update_8001() {}

To change the field size, there are four things we will do inside this hook.

Resize the Columns

We'll run a set of queries to update the relevant database columns.

$database = \Drupal::database(); $database->query("ALTER TABLE node__field_one_liner MODIFY field_one_liner_value VARCHAR(255)"); $database->query("ALTER TABLE node_revision__field_one_liner MODIFY field_one_liner_value VARCHAR(255)");

If revisions are disabled then the node_revision__field_one_liner table won't exist. So, you can remove the second query if your entity doesn't allow revisions.

Update Storage Schema

Resizing the columns with a query is not sufficient. Drupal maintains a record of what database schema is currently installed. If we don't do this then Drupal will think that the database schema needs to be updated because the column lengths in the database will not match the configuration storage.

$storage_key = 'node.field_schema_data.field_one_liner'; $storage_schema = \Drupal::keyValue('entity.storage_schema.sql'); $field_schema = $storage_schema->get($storage_key); $field_schema['node__field_one_liner']['fields']['field_one_liner_value']['length'] = 255; $field_schema['node_revision__field_one_liner']['fields']['field_one_liner_value']['length'] = 255; $storage_schema->set($storage_key, $field_schema);

The above code will update the key_value table to store the updated length of the field_one_liner in its configuration.

Update Field Configuration

We took care of the database schema data. However, there are other places where Drupal stores the configuration. Now, we will need to tell the Drupal config management system that the field length is 255.

// Update field configuration. $config = \Drupal::configFactory() ->getEditable('field.storage.node.field_one_liner'); $config->set('settings.max_length', 255); $config->save(TRUE);

Finally, Drupal also stores info about the actively installed configuration and schema. To refresh this, we will need to re-save the field storage configuration to make Drupal detect all our changes.

// Update field storage configuration. FieldStorageConfig::loadByName($entity_type, $field_name)->save();

After this, running drush updb or running update.php from the admin interface should detect your hook_update_N() and it should update your field size. If you're committing your configuration to git, you'll need to run drush config-export after running the database updates to update the config in the filesystem and then commit it.

Conclusion

Though we've talked about resizing a Text (Plain) or varchar field in this tutorial, we can resize any field type which can be safely resized using SQL. In certain rare scenarios, it might be necessary to create a temporary table with the new data-structure, copy the existing data into that table with queries and once all the data has been copied successfully, replace the existing table with the temporary table. For example, if you want to convert a Text (Plain) field to a Text (Long) field or some other type.

Maybe someday we'll have a resizing feature in Drupal where Drupal will intelligently allow us to increase a field's size from it's field UI and only deny reduction of field size where there is a possibility of data loss. But, in the meanwhile, we can use this handy trick to resize our fields. Thanks for reading! Please leave your comments / questions in the comments below and I'll get back to them as soon as I have time.

+ more awesome articles by Evolving Web

myDropWizard.com: CiviCRM secrets for Drupalers: Drupal 8 + CiviCRM June 2018 Update

3 dni 20 godzin ago

We're Drupalers who only recently started digging deep into CiviCRM and we're finding some really cool things! This series of videos is meant to share those secrets with other Drupalers, in case they come across a project that could use them. :-)

In the screencast below, I'll demonstrate the new demo of Roundearth! Roundearth is our Drupal 8 + CiviCRM Distribution.

Watch the screencast to see the progress so far on the Roundearth project:

Video of Roundearth June 2018 Update

Some highlights from the video:

  • Drupal 8.5
  • CiviCRM + Bootstrap based Shoreditch theme
  • Quick demo of adding Contacts, using a Group, and sending a Bulk Mailing
  • Quick demo of a Public Event

Please leave a comment below!

PreviousNext: Patch Drupal core without things ending up in core/core or core/b

3 dni 20 godzin ago

If you've ever patched Drupal core with Composer you may have noticed patched files can sometimes end up in the wrong place like core/core or core/b. Thankfully there's a quick fix to ensure the files make it into the correct location.

by Saul Willers / 14 June 2018

When using cweagans/composer-patches it's easy to include patches in your composer.json

"patches": { "drupal/core": { "Introduce a batch builder class to make the batch API easier to use": "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/2018-03-21/2401797-111.patch" } }

However in certain situations patches will get applied incorrectly. This can happen when the patch is only adding new files (not altering existing files), like in the patch above. The result is the patched files end up in a subfolder core/core. If the patch is adding new files and editing existing files the new files will end up in core/b. This is because composer-patches cycle through the -p levels trying to apply them; 1, 0, 2, then 4.

Thankfully there is an easy fix!

"extra": { ... "patchLevel": { "drupal/core": "-p2" } }

Setting the patch level to p2 ensures any patch for core will get applied correctly.

Note that until composer-patches has a 1.6.5 release, specifically this PR, you'll need to use the dev release like:

"require": { ... "cweagans/composer-patches": "1.x-dev" }

The 2.x branch of composer-patches also includes this feature.

Big thanks to cweagans for this great tool and jhedstrom for helping to get this into the 1.x branch.

Tagged Drupal Development, Composer

Acro Media: Drupal Point of Sale 8 Released!

4 dni 1 godzina ago
Official 8.0 Version Now Available


The Drupal Point of Sale provides a point of sale (POS) interface for Drupal Commerce, allowing in-person transactions via cash or card, returns, multiple registers and locations, and EOD reporting. It’s completely integrated with Drupal Commerce and uses the same products, customers, and orders between both systems. You can now bring your Drupal 8 online store and your physical store locations onto the same platform; maintaining a single data point.

The Drupal 7 version has been in the wild for a while now, but today marks the official, production ready release for Drupal 8.

Release Highlights

What features make up the new version of Drupal Point of Sale 8? There are so many that it will probably surprise you!

Omnichannel

Omnichannel is not just a buzzword, but a word that describes handling your online and offline stores with one platform, connecting your sales, stock and fulfillment centers in one digital location. Drupal Commerce has multi-store capabilities out of the box that allow you to create unique stores and share whatever product inventory, stock, promotions, and more between them. Drupal Point of Sale gives you the final tool you need to handle in-person transactions in a physical storefront location, all using your single Drupal Commerce platform. That’s pretty powerful stuff. Watch these videos (here and here) to learn more about how Drupal Commerce is true omnichannel.

Registers

Set up new registers with ease. Whether you have 1 or 1000 store locations, each store can have as many registers as you want. Because Drupal Point of Sale is a web-based solution, all you need to use a register is a web browser. A touch screen all-in-one computer, a laptop, an iPad; if it has a web browser, it can be your register. The Point of Sale is also fully open source, so there are no licensing fees and costs do not add up as you add more registers.

Customer Display


While a cashier is ringing through products, the Customer Display uses WebSocket technology to display the product, price, and current totals on a screen in real-time so the customer can follow along from the other side of the counter. Your customers can instantly verify everything you’re adding to the cart. All you need for the Customer Display is a web browser, so you can use an iPad, a TV or second monitor to display the information in real-time as the transaction progresses.

Barcode Scanning

Camera based barcode scanning
Don’t have a barcode scanner? No problem. With this release, any browser connected camera can be used to scan barcodes. Use a webcam, use your phone, use an iPad, whatever! If it has a camera, it works. This is helpful when you’re at an event or working a tradeshow and you don’t want to bring your hardware along.


Traditional barcode scanning
A traditional barcode scanner works too. Simply use the barcode scanner to scan the physical product’s barcode. The matching UPC code attached to one of your Drupal Commerce product variations will instantly add the product to your cashier’s display.

Labels

Generate and print labels complete with barcodes, directly from your Drupal Point of Sale interface. Labels are template based and can be easily customized to match any printer or label size so you can prep inventory or re-label goods as needed.

Receipts

Easily customize the header and footer of your receipts using the built in editor. Add your logo and contact information, return/exchange policy, special messaging or promotions, etc.

When issuing receipts, you can choose to print the receipt in a traditional fashion or go paperless and email it to your customer. You can do either, both, or none… whatever you want.

Returns

Whether online or in store, all of your orders are captured in Drupal Commerce and so can be returned, with or without the original receipt. A return can be an entire order or an individual product.

End of Day (EOD) Reports

When closing a register, you cashiers can declare their totals for the day. You can quickly see if you’re over or short. When finished, an ongoing daily report is collected that you can look back on. On top of this, Drupal Point of Sale is integrated with the core Drupal Commerce Reporting suite.

Hardware

Use Drupal POS 8 with anything that supports a browser and has an internet connection.

Technical Highlights

Adding to all of the user highlights above are a number of important technical improvements. It’s the underlying architecture that really makes Drupal Point of Sale shine.

Themable

Cashiers login to Drupal Point of Sale via a designed login page. Once logged in, the theme used is the default Drupal admin theme. However, like any other part of Drupal, your admin theme can be modified as much as you like. Keep it default or customize it to your brand; it’s yours to do with as you please.

Search API Enabled

The search API is a powerful search engine that lets you customize exactly what information is searchable. Using the Search API, your cashiers are sure to quickly find any product in your inventory by searching for a product’s title, SKU, UPC code (via barcode scanner), description, etc. Search API is completely customizable, so any additional unique search requirements can be easily added (brand, color, weight, etc.). The search API references the products on your site, and at any other store or multi-warehouse location to allow for you to serve customers in real-time. 

Fully Integrated with Drupal Commerce

The Drupal Point of Sale module seamlessly integrates into the existing Drupal Commerce systems and architecture. It shares products, stock, customers, orders, promotions and more. This makes Drupal Point of Sale plug-and-play while also making sure that the code base is maintainable and can take advantage of future Drupal Commerce features and improvements.

Permissions and Roles

When Drupal Point of Sale is installed, a “cashier” user role is created that limits the access users of this type have with your Drupal Commerce backend. Use Drupal’s fine grained permissions and roles system to manage your cashiers and give different permissions to employees, managers, marketers, owners, IT, etc. Any way you want it.

Custom Hardware

As mentioned above, all you need to use Drupal POS 8 is anything that supports a browser and has an internet connection. This opens the door for all kinds of custom Point of Sale hardware such as branded terminals, self-serve kiosks, tradeshow-ready hardware, and more.

We’ve been having fun prototyping various Raspberry Pi based POS hardware solutions. You can see some of them here and stay tuned for more. Drupal Point of Sale is open source, so why not open up the hardware too?

Drupal Point of Sale 8, Ready for your Drupal Commerce platform

We’re excited to finally release the production ready version of Drupal Point of Sale 8.0. There are many ecommerce-only platforms out there, but almost none of them can ALSO run in your physical store too. This is a BIG DEAL. Drupal Point of Sale gives you the last piece needed to run your entire store using Drupal Commerce allowing for centralized data and a single system for your team to learn and manage.

One admin login, one inventory list, one user list, one marketing platform, ONE. True omnichannel, without the fees.

Next Step

Commerce Kickstart
Starting a Drupal Commerce project from scratch? Use Commerce Kickstart to configure your install package (including Drupal Point of Sale).

Install with Composer
Already using Commerce for Drupal 8? Install Drupal Point of Sale with Composer.

$ composer require drupal/commerce_pos

Let Acro Media help
Acro Media is North America’s #1 Drupal Commerce provider. We build enterprise commerce using open source solutions. Unsure if Drupal Commerce and Drupal Point of Sale meet your business requirements? A teammate here at Acro Media would be happy to walk you through a replatforming evaluation exercise and provide you with the Point of Sale workbook to help you make your decision.

More from Acro Media