Drupal Planet

Kristian Polso: Launching Pino: a Drupal 8 Distribution for Member Management

6 godzin 7 minutes ago
Last week I published Pino: a Member Management web app built as a custom Drupal 8 distribution. With Pino, you can manage members and their metadata, send email notifications to the members and more. I have been thinking about this doing this project for some time now. I am personally a board member in several associations, and I have seen several different member management solutions. Most common of them all, is honestly just Excel.

Craft of Coding: Drupal on OpenShift: Enhancing the developer experience

7 godzin 7 minutes ago

Learn how to automate all the pieces once you deploy your first Drupal 8 site on OpenShift. We walked through a detailed Drupal 8 deployment on OpenShift. We just scratched the surface of OpenShift and didn’t explore all its features. In this post, we will further this setup by enhancing the developer experience in using OpenShift. […]

The post Drupal on OpenShift: Enhancing the developer experience appeared first on Craft of Coding.

Spinning Code: SC DUG February 2019

9 godzin 38 minutes ago

For the SC DUG meeting this month Will Jackson from Kanopi Studios gave a talk about using Docksal for local Drupal development. Will has the joy of working with some of the Docksal developers and has become an advocate for the simplicity and power Docksal provides.

We frequently use these presentations to practice new presentations, try out heavily revised versions, and test out new ideas with a friendly audience. If you want to see a polished version checkout our group members’ talks at camps and cons. So if some of the content of these videos seems a bit rough please understand we are all learning all the time and we are open to constructive feedback.

If you would like to join us please check out our up coming events on Meetup for meeting times, locations, and connection information.

OpenSense Labs: Going ultra-minimalist: Metalsmith with Drupal

1 dzień 5 godzin ago
Going ultra-minimalist: Metalsmith with Drupal Shankar Sun, 02/17/2019 - 22:22

A metalsmith sees potential where others might see trash. In his vision, a plastic bag can become a ring, the zipper can turn into a bracelet and brass platters can be metamorphosed into a striking hollow vessel. In the digital spectrum, there’s another Metalsmith which can shape a great web presence for your organisation with its amazing web development capabilities.


A combination of Metalsmith and Drupal even more fruitful with Drupal’s spectacular backend that can be used to feed data to all sorts of clients and Metalsmith’s exceptional capabilities as a static site generator.

Forging an understanding Source: Werner Glinka | Twin Cities Drupal Camp 2018

Metalsmith is not aimed at particular project types such as blogs. It supports a wide array of templates and data format options. It offers a simple plug-in architecture and is easy to get started. It uses a modular structure. Its lightweight nature and fewer dependencies make its a magnificent solution.

Metalsmith is an extremely simple, pluggable static site generator - Metalsmith.io

Static site generators create HTML code locally on the developer’s computer and all the required components are stored in a well-structured directory characterised by the strict separation of layout and content. That means a static site generator produces static build files for their deployment to a web server wherein the files are developed from source files. This is exactly the reasoning on which Metalsmith was built. Metalsmith is more than just a static site generator as everything is a plugin and Metalsmith core is an abstraction for manipulation of the file directory. It can be used for building a plethora of use cases like a project scaffolder, or an ebook generator, or even the technical docs.
 
Its working principle is simple. It takes the information from the source files of a source directory and it, then, writes the manipulated information to the files into a destination directory. The manipulations can be the translation of templates, replacement of variables, grouping files, moving files among others.
 
All the manipulations are done by plugins. Only thing Metalsmith has to take care of in its core is to offer an underlying logic of how the manipulations are confronted with and for a defined interface for the plugins. Moreover, source files are, in the nascent stage itself, converted into JavaScript objects so that plugins only do the modifications to the JavaScript objects. Moreover, Metalsmith is divided into a core and several plugins that minimises the intricacy by giving the user complete authority to use only those plugins that are needed and disseminating the task of maintaining the Metalsmith core to the Metalsmith community. Being programmed in Javascript, the need for another language like Python or Ruby is eliminated and it also has a simple plugin-interface thereby offering a simple workflow.

Metalsmith with Drupal

Twin Cities Drupal Camp 2018 had a session that demonstrated how a headless Drupal 8 installation serves content to a local Metalsmith-based static website build process. Drupal 8 turned out to be a fantastic backend CMS for serving data to all kinds of clients. Here, simply put, the local environment is the Metalsmith process uploading anything onto the Github. Once uploaded, Netlify loads it into its own process and publishes it.

Source: Werner Glinka | Twin Cities Drupal Camp 2018

Server data are leveraged for building pages dynamically at build time with the assistance of Metalsmith as the static site generator and the Nunjucks template engine. As a result, the merits of a static website as well as the magnificent backend data governance of Drupal is obtained. Drupal is only utilised for governing content in the backend and is then used to serve the content to the build process through an API.

Conclusion

Metalsmith, along with Drupal's great prowess in content governance, can be a great solution for building static sites.
 
We believe in empowering the digital firms and making their digital transformation dreams come true with our suite of services.
 
Let us know how do you want us to help you build an astounding web presence at hello@opensenselabs.com

blog banner blog image Metalsmith Drupal 8 Headless Drupal Decoupled Drupal Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

Vardot: How to Rank #1 on Google Using Drupal CMS

1 dzień 9 godzin ago
Firas Ghunaim February 17, 2019

"Content is king! SEO is so 2017." Sure, why not.

Where is that king's throne? Where do you find content?

Content is found on web and mobile pages across the internet, amongst millions of millions of pages. Search Engine Optimization is about the process of being found by your content consumers and readers.

What Search Engine Optimization is not is that it's all about keywords; a common and prevalent misconception. You still need to create content that is of relevance to someone searching for it.

and of course, follow Google's rules and learn their ranking factors.

Basic stuff really.

"SEO? Gotta follow the Google machine's rules bro"

 

A critical consideration that usually escapes the decision-making process of what to use to publish that content: Which CMS suits my needs the most? 

A CMS (Content Management System) is the beating heart of your digital platform, website or experience. It is where you develop, manage and publish your content. Most websites look like Ferraris' but drive like an Austin Allegro.

Long story short, the CMS you built your site on will play a key role in your SEO efforts.

 

4 Ways Drupal CMS Enhances Your SEO

I am not here to shamelessly promote Drupal CMS (I really am though), but if you are looking to create the best digital experience for your users without bothering about on-site SEO then look no further than Drupal.

At its core, Drupal was built with SEO in mind. It has the power, flexibility, and tools needed to optimize every facet of your website for search engines, and in its huge kit of modules, there are quite a few that are dedicated to giving you an easier time when it comes to improving the optimization of your website. 

 

1. Implementing Meta tags

 

Meta tags are bits of text that are integral when it comes to improving your website’s search ranking, because, in a way, it tells search engines what the content is on each page on your website. This could be the titles of your pages to the little descriptions you see underneath the website links on a Google results page. You and your search engine need these bits of information to properly present and index your site on the search results page.

Usually, you can leave it up to your search engine to generate your page’s metadata for you, but by using the Drupal Metatag module, you can customize the metadata yourself. Set your own information such as page titles and descriptions to more properly and correctly present your site to your search engine and the online world.

 

Read More: 6 Reliable SEO Tools To Make Your Life Easier   2. Cleaning up Your URLs

 

Having bad, messy-looking links is a no-no when it comes to SEO. You want links that are easy to read and not just a jumble of letters and numbers so that they look more attractive to prospective visitors and to your search engine, who may be looking at your URL for keywords when it determines your site’s ranking.

Many web developers never realize the implications of messy URLs and leave their link syntax as-is, but going through each and every page on your website and manually setting the URLs isn’t an attractive option either. Luckily, Drupal generates clean URLs by default, improving the readability of your links and making things a bit easier on you.

If you want your links to be better and even more easy on the eyes, popular Drupal module Pathauto is a configurable system that automatically creates clean and extremely readable links that are perfect for your site’s optimization.

Another thing to keep in mind is making sure that your links actually go somewhere. Nothing sours the user experience more than clicking a link and being presented with a 404 page, and this in turn negatively affects your search rankings.

You can avoid this from happening by using the Redirect module. If you happened to have changed the page’s URL after Google indexed it, or moved the content to a different URL, this module allows you to make 301 redirects from that old link to the new one, quickly and painlessly, without having to go through the headache of cleaning up after yourself and fixing broken links.

 

3. Improving Page Speed

 

Google has been using the speed your page loads as an influencing factor in search rankings for years at this point. As they point out, sites that load faster have users that stay on for much longer, so it’s not only Google that you’re pleased by speeding up your website.

You might have to spend a little to have your website up to speed, but Drupal comes with several measures to help pages load faster, such as using BigPipe.

However, it’s not only desktop users you have to keep in mind, but mobile users, too. Given the leaps and bounds that technology has undergone in the last couple of years, you now find more and more people browsing the web on their smartphones and tablets. It’s important to make sure that your site experience is just as friendly and accessible on mobile devices as it is on desktop computers. As anyone who has used a desktop site on a mobile device knows, it’s not a pleasant experience.

Drupal’s default theme is responsive by design, which means it will display well on mobile screens of any size without having to do complicated rewrites of code or having to juggle multiple URLs to make sure your site displays correctly. With Google now also looking at the page speed of mobile sites, it’s now more important than ever to focus on delivering a good, well-optimized mobile experience to improve your SEO.

 

Read more: SEO Checklist Before Launching Your Drupal Website

 

4. Talking to Your Search Engine

 

Optimizing your website can be a little tough when you don’t even know basic things such as where your site traffic is coming from. Installing modules like Google Analytics makes you privy to such information, and for someone with their finger on the pulse of the site’s SEO, it’s perhaps one of the most important tools they can have.

With Google Analytics, you get to know things about your site visitors: Where in the world they come from, which links they followed to get to your site, which pages they visit and how much time they spend on those pages, what keywords they searched to find your page and more. If you’re concerned about SEO, then getting information about your website directly from Google, the most popular search engine in the world is valuable information to have, and can help you make decisions on what to improve on next.

And while you’re pulling information from Google about your website, you can also provide information about your website to Google in the form of an XML sitemap. These are specially formatted, condensed summaries of the pages of content on your website that you can submit to Google to help them find your site and let their bots crawl through your pages. Google can crawl through your site without an XML sitemap, but you take on the risk of them possibly missing pages.

With Drupal, generating an XML sitemap is as easy as installing the XML sitemap module which creates one for you, and modules like Cron can automatically make sure your sitemap is kept up-to-date with the latest information from your website.

Read More: Top 5 Drupal Modules For Marketers

Drupal is inherently optimized for search engines after all the whole idea behind Drupal was to enable the creation of digital experiences that are user-centric. That user includes the development team who are always aided by the open-source community of experts that provide us with awesome SEO tools such as the SEO Checklist.

You see, friend... SEO is not dead. Content's prominence just made SEO eternal.

Want to boost your site’s traffic and rank #1 on Google with Drupal? Message us through our Contact Us page, or via email at sales@vardot.com.

Aten Design Group: Flexible Authoring with Structured Content

3 dni 8 godzin ago

As a writer or editor for your organization’s website, you should be able to quickly write articles or build pages that are collections of smaller elements. You should be able to write some text, add a slideshow, write some more text, perhaps list a few tweets, and finish things off with a list of related content. Or maybe you paste in a pull quote, add a couple full-width images with captions, or even put together an interactive timeline. Your content management system should let you do all that, easily. But chances are, it won’t be with the WYSIWYG you’re used to right now.

What You See Isn’t What You Get

WYSIWYG editors still fall short when it comes to doing much more than simple formatting and embedding a few images. Anything beyond that, and the underlying technology has to leverage some kind of proprietary “smart code” or “token” and do some find-and-replace magic that makes slideshows, media players, or other more complex blocks of content show up right to the editor. These tokens aren’t typically based on any adopted standard. It’s just this custom, arbitrary formatting shortcut that programmers decided to use that tells the CMS, “Replace this snippet with that other piece of content.”

If it sounds complicated, that’s because it is. It’s hard to get right. It’s hard to build in a sustainable way. It’s hard – impossible, really – to make it look right and work well for authors. It’s REALLY hard to migrate.

Here’s an example: In earlier versions of Drupal, Node Embed was a way to embed one piece of content (say, an image) inside the body of another (like an article). The “smart code” [[nid: 123]] tells Drupal, “replace this with the piece of content that has an ID of 123.” It worked, but the authoring experience was janky. And it really wasn’t structured content, since your markup would end up littered with these proprietary snippets referencing objects in the CMS. Somewhere down the line, someone would inevitably have to migrate all of that and write regular expressions and processors to parse it back into a sane structure for the new system. That gets expensive.

Fieldable Entities and Structured Content

The thing that lets you, the web editor, write content that is both manageable and flexible is breaking your content into discrete, single-purpose fields. In Drupal it’s called “fieldable entities.” You don’t dump everything into the WYSIWYG (which would be hard to do anyway). Instead, there’s a field to add the author’s name, a field for attaching images, and a field for the text (that last part gets the WYSIWYG). More generally, this serves an important concept called “structured content.” Content is stored in sensible chunks. It adapts to a variety of contexts, like a mobile app or a news aggregator or (of course) your website. In the case of your website, your CMS pushes all those fields through a template, and voila, the page is published beautifully and your readers eat it up.

What If My Fields Have Fields?

Here’s where it gets interesting. Back to our earlier example: let’s say your article has a couple slideshows. Each slideshow has a few images, captions, and links. Suddenly your discrete, single-purpose field (slideshow) has its own fields (images, captions, links). And, you may want to add a slideshow virtually anywhere in the flow of the page. Perhaps the page goes text, slideshow, text. Or maybe it’s text, slideshow, text, some tweets, another slideshow. And now you want to swap some things around. Again, you should be able to do all that, easily.

Drupal Paragraphs

Enter the Drupal Paragraphs module. Paragraphs takes the approach of creating content bundles, or collections of fields, that can be mixed and matched on a given page in virtually countless configurations. They’re called “Paragraphs” because they are flexible, structured building blocks for pages. The name is a little misleading; in fact, they are 100% configurable groups of fields that can be added, edited, and rearranged however you want on a given article. You can have paragraph types for slideshows, pull quotes, tweets, lists of related content, or virtually anything else. Paragraphs are building blocks: smaller elements that can be combined to build a page. And like I said earlier, you should be able to easily make pages from collections of smaller elements.

Drupal Paragraphs is Sort of Easy

We use Drupal Paragraphs whenever a particular type of content (a news article, blog post, etc.) is really built up of smaller, interchangeable collections of other fields (text, slideshows, videos, etc.). Drupal Paragraphs are flexible and organized. They let authors create whatever kinds of pages they want, while storing content in a way that is structured and adaptable. Migrations with Paragraphs are generally easier than migrations with special, proprietary embed codes. Breaking content types into Paragraphs gives authors the flexibility they need, without sacrificing structure. You don’t end up with a bunch of garbage pasted into an open WYSIWYG field.

So what’s the catch? Well, the interface isn’t awesome. Using Drupal Paragraphs can add a lot of complexity to the authoring experience. Forms will have nested forms. It can be overwhelming.

Alternatives to Drupal Paragraphs

As I’m writing this, another approach to page building is gathering momentum in the Drupal universe. Layout Builder is currently an experimental module in core, and slated to ship as a stable release with Drupal 8.7. Layout Builder provides a slick drag-and-drop interface for editors to build pages from blocks and fields. We’re excited to see how Layout Builder develops, and to see how well it performs for large editorial websites. For websites with hundreds or thousands of articles, managing pages with Layout Builder may be difficult. As Drupal’s founder, Dries Buytaert, pointed out in a post late last year, “On large sites, the free-form page creation is almost certainly going to be a scalability, maintenance and governance challenge.”

Other open source CMS communities are seeing a similar rise in the demand to provide authors with flexible page-building tools. WordPress released Gutenberg, a powerful drag-and-drop editing experience that lets authors quickly build incredibly flexible pages from a massive library of components. It’s worth noting Gutenberg is not without challenges. It poses accessibility issues. Antithetical to the themes in this post, it does not necessarily produce structured content. It relies on proprietary tokens for referencing embedded blocks of content. But it is very flexible, and offers an expressive interface for authors. For Drupal users, there’s a Drupal port for Gutenberg.

For us at Aten, the balance comes back to making sure content is stored in a way that is structured, can be adaptive, is reusable, and is relatively easy to migrate. And that you, the writer, can easily build flexible web pages.

Structured and Adaptable: Drupal Paragraphs with Layout Control

We’ve been working on an approach that keeps Paragraphs in place as the primary way content is managed and stored, but also gives authors the ability to easily control layout. Using Drupal’s core Layout Discovery system, Entity Reference with Layout is a custom field type that combines layouts and Paragraphs. It’s still in very early experimental development, but we’re excited about the impact this approach might have on making it even easier to create flexible pages. And it uses Paragraphs for content storage, with the benefits we’ve already touched on: content is well-structured and relatively easy to migrate. It’s not as flexible or robust as Layout Builder, but might be a great option for authoring flexible pages with Paragraphs. (More on this in a future post.)

Reusable and Flexible: Advanced Paragraphs

Since Drupal Paragraphs are themselves collections of flexible fields, there are all kinds of interesting ways they can be applied to building complex publishing features. We’re working with a client in publishing who needs the ability to completely customize the way content appears on their home page. They would like to promote existing content to the homepage, but they may want to override article titles, images, and summaries. Since the article authors aren’t the same people editing the home page and other key listing pages, they didn’t want authors to have to think about all of those variations. The way content is presented on an article page isn’t always the best-suited for the homepage and other contexts. We used paragraphs to give home page editors the ability to drop articles onto the page, with fields for overriding everything they need to.

Where to Go From Here

Your CMS should make it easy to write content and build pages. If you’re interested in seeing a demo of Drupal Paragraphs, Layout Builder, or Gutenberg, drop us a line. We’d love to help.

Promet Source: 4 Key Success Factors for Driving Change

4 dni 2 godziny ago
A commercial came on the radio recently advertising a software application that would, basically, revolutionize data management and enable employees to be more efficient. My first thought was, “How can they possibly promise that when they don’t know their customers’ data management processes?” Then, it became clear. The business processes would have to be changed in order to accommodate the software. Is that appropriate? Is it right that an organization should be required to change the way it conducts business in order to implement a software application? 

OpenSense Labs: Jigsaw Puzzle of Drupal Media & 3rd Party Solutions: Can Integration Complete the Picture?

4 dni 2 godziny ago
Jigsaw Puzzle of Drupal Media & 3rd Party Solutions: Can Integration Complete the Picture? Vasundhra Fri, 02/15/2019 - 01:13

Communication is the heart of all human interactions and the media is like the blood pumping all the necessary ideas and expressions. 

Media provides the essential link between the individual and the demands of the technological society.
-Jacques Ellul

We as individuals view hundreds of advertisement each day. Digging through that phone and eyes glued to those tabs. People like us have produced a substantial rise in marketing tactics. 

Marketing tactics such as social media, videos, search engine optimization, mobile paid media, and marketing of the emails have simulated the need for good quality content. What our minds’ decide to pay attention to depends on the interest and how compelling the advertisement or piece of content is.

It is necessary for organizations to realize their target persona, and serve up content that will bust through the clutter and hit homes with their customer.

Drupal Media can serve up this task beautifully and can do almost anything by gracefully blending digital assets in it.  

You ask how?

I say - let’s find out!

The Evolution of Media Management in Drupal 8  Drupal 8 Versions When was it introduced? What was offered? Drupal 8.2 5th October 2006  Basic out-of-the-box media handling  Drupal 8.3 6th April 2017 This brought enhanced media handling in Drupal 8. Migrating Drupal 7 File Entities to Drupal 8 Media Entities Drupal 8.4 4th October 2017 Introduction of a new Media API to the core. For site builders, Drupal 8.4 ships with the new media module i.e base media entity Drupal 8.5 7th March 2018  Supported remote video using the oEmbed format. Drupal 8.6 7th November 2018  For the content creator, richer image and media integration and digital asset management. Media Type and Best Solutions to Handle Them

Media type as we know has been generally categorized with the data content such as an application, audio content, image text message, a video stream and so on. Media type conveys the applications that in return tell them what type of application is needed for the process. Media Types like Pictures, graphics, icons, video are handled beautifully with the help of Drupal modules. 

Media types can be handled with the help of some practices :

  • Media Module Maintenance 

Modules maintenance in Drupal can be achieved with the help of distinct features and functionalities. Status report screen (which checks a variety of issues), cron (that automates the task of a website in “N” hour), caching and deployment, are some of the pieces to the whole module maintenance picture.

Media module provides a “base” entity for assets. This allows users to standardize Drupal site interactions with media resources. Local files, images, youtube video, tweets can be treated with the help of a media module. 

  • Building Distributions 

If you are setting up a Drupal site then it would typically mean being involved in downloading and configuring various contributed modules (media and non-media). To make the whole process easier there are a variety of “Pre-configured” versions of Drupal that can be downloaded and used for a specific site. These pre-configured versions of Drupal are called distributions. With these “full-featured” distributions you can easily and quickly set up a site for the specialized purpose.  

  • Site Building 

Drupal 8 comes with the most popular text editor modules and image uploader modules. These both provide the users with basic HTML controls and the power to edit the content. Text editor modules like paragraphs grant the user with a cleaner data structure. The scope of making mistakes is next to null due to the module known as the environmental indicator that helps in correcting mistakes. 

  • Custom Development 

Drupal is a collection of modules and distribution. With more and more organizations looking to build an engaging digital experience for their stakeholders, the Drupal CMS has made custom developments in its platform. The version brings significant changes in modules that help in better user experience and efficiency of the website. 

Media expectations as a content author and Site Builders  

State of Drupal 2016 survey which 2,900 people attended and participated in got the top two most requested features in terms of content creator persona.

The top two features which were adequately demanded were

  • Richer media 
  • Media integration

Thus, “media initiative” for Drupal 8 was introduced that provided with extensible base functionalities. For the media handling in the core the support of the reusable assets, media browsing, remote video with the extensible cleanliness of contributed modules were made. 

In Drupal 7 the media module was jam-packed with many functionalities. Now in Drupal 8 it has been recreated and introduced into separate modules. The three major modules which beautifully handles the media entities are named as:

Media Entity 

To store media assets, media entity modules were introduced. This module provides a base entity for the media, a very basic entity which refers to all kinds of media objects. Media entity also presented a relation between Drupal and media resource.  

Entity Embed

WYSIWYG embed support(within the text area) is allowed by the entity embed module in Drupal 8. The core consists of an editor and a filter module. This module allows a site builder to construct a button which leads an editor with the text area, hence the name “entity embed”.

Entity Browser

The entity browser module provides flexible and generic entity browsing and selection tools. It can be used in any context where one needs to select a number of entities and do something with them. The inline entity also provided with the integration of the media.

Site builders want that every type of media usage should be easily tracked and be presented to them. These three modules help them in achieving this task.

Third Party integrations for media solutions 

DAM (Digital Asset Media)

A digital asset is any text or media that is formatted into a binary source and includes the right to use it. All the digital files that do not include this right are not considered digital assets. Digital assets are categorized into images and multimedia, called media assets, and textual content and the management of these types of assets is known as Digital Asset Management. Modules like Acquia DAM, Bynder, integration module, EMBridge, S3 file sync, Q bank, Asset Bank, Media Valet, Elvis contribute to the integration of DAM and Drupal media. 

CDN (content delivery network)

CDN is a globally distributed network of proxy servers. It integrates offload static assets like images, videos, CSS and JS.

CDN like Cloudflare offers image compression and is great for content delivery network services. CDN provides several advantages over serving the traffic directly:

  1. Assets can be cached in a proxy which is geographically closer to the end users that usually leads to high download speed.
  2. Each page response is shared with the origin server and the CDN.
  3. Some of the CDN’s provides with page optimization service which further enhances the performance and also the user experience. 

To make the integration easier Drupal has a CDN module that would help in speeding up the process and make it more agile. 


External Storage 

It is not uncommon for large files and folders to get into the way of website speed. Large files are not usually cached resulting in every request to load the website slow. Drupal modules like the S3 file system, storage API, AmazonS3 contributes highly to integrate external storage. These modules manage the storage and the files in its API by providing an additional file system to your Drupal sites. 

Infrastructure 

One of the most prominent examples of integrating infrastructure is Cloudflare. It is one of the biggest networks operating on the Internet. People use Cloudflare services for the purposes of increasing the security and performance of their websites. 

A number of various solutions implemented at customers' facilities are rather large today. Often the subsystems of seemingly unified IT landscape are either loosely connected to each other or the interaction between them is ensured by file and data transfer via e-mail or from hand to hand.

When content becomes media 

Content on your website would start acting like media because let’s face it the content repository or the content that is stored in the database of the digital content is an association set of data management, search and access method allowing accessing of content. It includes

Content Pooling 

Content pooling involves the storing of the learning material in form of objects, meta-data as well as the relation which is there between them. It is the grouping up of the resources together (assets, resources etc) of the purpose of maximizing profit and minimizing risks, content pooling is done. 

Content Syndication 

Content Syndication is the building up of a suite of Drupal site that needs a way to consume content from a central Drupal source. The CMS provides a number of splendid tools to simplify content creation and moderation. The users can create content once and make it available everywhere. Push content and media items at any sites to publish them on any targeted remote site. 

Deploy

This module of Drupal 8 allows the user to easily stage and preview content on all Drupal sites. It automatically manages dependencies between entities and is specially designed for rich API which can easily be extended. 

Contenta CMS 

The main agenda of Contenta CMS was to make the content happy. It is a community-driven API first distribution for Drupal 8 which provides users with a standard platform alongside the content. Contenta CMS is all about easing the pain of its users. It builds decoupled applications and websites. 

Beyond version 8 

Drupal 8 was launched without the support of the media library. Thus, the addition of the media library is planned to be launched in Drupal 8. The developers have been currently working on adding a media library to Drupal 8 so that the content authors can select pre-existing media from a library and easily embed them in their posts. Once the media library becomes stable, the content authors can deprecate the use of the old file upload functionality and make the new media library the default experience.

Instead of working on Drupal 9 as a separate code base, it is planned to be launched in Drupal 8 which means that new functionalities are being added on the backward compatibility code along with the experimental features. For contributed module authors, Drupal 9 is working on compatibilities (Before the release of Drupal 9 the users are allowed to update their media module for the new media library) 

Source: Dries Buytaert's blogConclusion

As the world is getting more and more involved in the act of media, the need for handling it has become really important. 

Media is important because it allows the people to transmit information to a larger audience, over a greater length of time. The importance of the media today is immense. Never before in mankind's history have the media had such an influence. 

Yes, Drupal has come a long way in this sector. Contact us on hello@opensenselabs.com to know more about the media handling in your Drupal sites and the services which are provided by us.

blog banner blog image Drupal Drupal 8 CMS Media Media Management Media Solutions Digital Asset Management Content Delivery Network External Storage Content Syndication Content Pooling Blog Type Articles Is it a good read ? On

Drudesk: A glimpse at Drupal 8 and Vue.js combination

4 dni 9 godzin ago

The trend of using JavaScript frameworks with Drupal keeps gaining popularity. It is used for creating rich, fast, and interactive web interfaces. One of the hot use areas is decoupled (headless Drupal 8) architecture, with the front-end part completely entrusted to a JS framework. There are many JS frameworks and libraries that pair well with Drupal 8 — React, Angular, Gatsby, Ember, Elm etc. Today, we will review one of them — Vue.js. Let’s take a closer look at Drupal 8 and Vue.js combination.